5 6 7 8 9 Displaying 43-49 of 82 Articles

I am obsessed, to say the least, with rude behavior. My kids beg me to ignore it, my husband thinks I'll get shot one day. I have, sometimes, gone too far, and have been rude myself in the quest for justice. But, for some reason, I think it is my duty, my calling, to rid the world of rudeness, one annoying person at a time. Like people who talk on their cell phones at the movies, or who clip their nails in public, or who don't say "thanks" when you hold a door open for them, or who cut in line.  Continue reading...

The Triangle shirtwaist factory fire of 1911 was always a source of morbid fascination for me when I was a child growing up in New York City. My father's mother had worked at the Triangle Waist Company in 1909, finishing buttonholes, and while she had left the sweatshop more than a year before the notorious fire that claimed some 150 lives (to marry and give birth to my father in the back of a grocery store in Brooklyn), that fire felt like an event in my family history. She could have died in the fire.  Continue reading...

I have a nephew called Robert. About three years ago, when Robert was still quite small, I was in his bedroom with my husband Peter, and Robert's dad. As we were talking, my husband picked up Robert's Professor Gangrene doll, which had a particularly revolting, greenish face. And when my husband heard the doll's name, he said, "What I want to know is, where do all these criminal masterminds get their degrees from?" Whereupon Robert's dad immediately replied: "From the university of Evil."

Immediately, my antennae went up. That's how most writers work: we often get our best ideas from conversations like this.

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How much research did you have to do before writing your book? That's one of the questions you'll hear most often if you've just published an international thriller. Implicit is the assumption all that research had to be done before the story was written, yet in reality the writing process was never that linear, especially for a first-time author.  Continue reading...

When I wrote Confessions of Super Mom, I wrote it as a stand alone book. Meaning I had no thought of continuing the story further. I was not a reader of series books; women's fiction, at least at that time, didn't really put out many series. They were mainly single titles, and that was what I read, and it was what I thought I'd written.  Continue reading...

Over a woe-is-me, three-martini lunch twenty years ago, a pal and fellow disgruntled stockbroker told me a tale that became the basis for my debut novel, Big Numbers. A half-eaten olive spat from my mouth even before I heard the punchline. "Say that again?"  Continue reading...

I daydream a lot. If my mother had been the sort of mother who kept boxes of elementary school mementos, I could prove it with the comments sections of my report cards. "Kristi (I changed the "i" to a "y" sometime during adolescence, forever confounding my grandparents) is very bright, but tends to daydream too much," or "Kristi could be an "A" student if she stopped daydreaming." So my mother wasn't the sort of mother who kept every scrap of my childhood perfectly preserved, but luckily for me she was the sort of mother who didn't get all worked up about curtailing daydreams.  Continue reading...

5 6 7 8 9 Displaying 43-49 of 82 Articles