6 7 8 9 10 Displaying 50-56 of 82 Articles

At the outset, a famous novelist warned me that if I insisted on writing Finn I ought to be constantly on my guard. "Mr. Clemens," he said, "will be looking over your shoulder." He didn't know the half of it. And frankly, neither did I.

Only when I showed early bits of the manuscript to other writers did I begin to understand. There was plenty of encouragement, of course, and lots of praise, but beneath it all was an undercurrent of, How dare you?

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I wrote Cures for Heartbreak over a period of eight years, though when I started writing it I had no idea that it would take so long to finish.

Cures for Heartbreak is a very personal story for me: the fifteen-year-old narrator, Mia Pearlman, loses her mother to melanoma days after the diagnosis, just as I did. It seems that many writers are drawn to personal material for their first books, and when I started writing fiction, the material that I couldn't keep away from was about my mother's death.

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Long before I ever dreamed up The Hazards of Hunting a Duke, a teacher told my class that the reason we should appreciate history is because we, as a society, can't know where we are going unless we know from where we have come.

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I was a cocky, sure-footed 29-year-old when I sent my Godmother a tear sheet from one of the celebrity magazines I wrote for. I was proud of it, in that Los Angeles, I'm-so-important-now kind of way. I was a writer working in the entertainment industry. It just didn't get any better than that. I was hob-knobbing with teen idols, movie and TV stars, rock 'n' roll bands, and had access to any backstage area I chose. Life was good.

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I was starting to feel like Milton from Office Space, the character who walks around mumbling, "I... I... I could set the building on fire." Ten years in advertising can do that to you. Finally, one ordinary February day in Chicago, I came home and told my wife I was fantasizing about smuggling an automatic weapon into work. We split a bottle of wine and discussed options that didn't involve jail time. By the end of the night, I'd decided to quit.

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So when are you getting married? Subconsciously the idea for my book My Invisible Husband developed from hearing the question one too many times. It tells the tale of one woman's desperate attempt to stop this age-old question posed to all women at some point in their lives.

Being over 30, single and having no kids, people automatically assume the book is about my life. Those things are the few similarities I have with the 34 year old fictional character Nicolette (Nikki) Montana. My Invisible Husband is fiction and strictly a figment of my vivid imagination. Women who have had well meaning family members and friends invade their personal life can probably relate to Nikki and her plight.

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I was inspired to write my first novel, Maisie Dobbs, by the character herself, who appeared in my mind's eye as I allowed my imagination to wander while stuck in traffic. I have referred to that spark of creativity as a moment of "artistic grace." It best describes the experience that led me to rush home from work later that day to begin writing, because by the time I started my car to drive home, I had the entire story in my head.

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6 7 8 9 10 Displaying 50-56 of 82 Articles