7 8 9 10 11 Displaying 57-63 of 216 Articles

A penny saved is a penny earned, or so says Ben Franklin. As part of our classroom study on aphorisms and early American literature, we take a bit of a side trip into learning about almanacs. For most high schoolers, the mention of an almanac brings about a blank expression. Yet the 200+ year old Farmer's Almanac is still alive and kicking, although the hole (for hanging on the outhouse door) has disappeared.  Continue reading...
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If you see a word that ends in the suffix -ism, you can be sure it's a noun. But if you are thinking of a noun as a "person, place or thing" and you consider "a thing" as a tangible object, then think again. A word ending in -ism usually represents something more abstract -- like an idea, theory, or doctrine. Use this week's worksheet to introduce students to some words ending in -ism that represent political beliefs.  Continue reading...
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This week's worksheet introduces students to a whole host of animal adjectives that they can use in their descriptive writing and add to their insult arsenals. It's so much more fun to refer to someone's eating habits as "porcine" instead of just saying they "eat like a pig," right?  Continue reading...
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Lake Superior State University released its 2012 List of Banished Words this month — a collection of words they deem as "Banished from the Queen's English for Misuse, Overuse and General Uselessness." Teachers, if you shared this news with your students, however, they probably wouldn't recognize this list of words and phrases as "overused."  Continue reading...
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What happens when nouns turn into verbs, and how can language arts educators use these "verbings" as teachable moments? Fitch O'Connell, a longtime teacher of English as a foreign language, takes a look at this "trending" topic.  Continue reading...
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Michelle Dunaway, who teaches English and journalism at Francis Howell High School in St. Charles, Missouri, writes that interviewing is an integral part of teaching students about public speaking. She encourages English teachers to think of interviewing as "a way for students to start small in building up their public speaking repertoire."  Continue reading...
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An eponym is a word that is derived from a person's name — or, in this case, an ancient figure's name. Instead of calling something harsh, students can learn to call it draconian, herculean or sisyphean — after they learn about the ancient figures that served as inspiration for these adjectives.  Continue reading...
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7 8 9 10 11 Displaying 57-63 of 216 Articles