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Blog Excerpts

American English? What's That?

Robert Lane Greene, a journalist for The Economist who contributes to the magazine's excellent language blog Johnson, has contributed a fascinating column on the Macmillan Dictionary blog about American English. Greene uses his own personal linguistic biography to question the whole idea of a monolithic "American English." Read the column here.
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Did you grow up speaking English in America or Canada? Then you can take part in an ambitious online project to gather information about the many diverse accents of North American English. All you need is a computer with a microphone, and your voice can be heard!  Continue reading...
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In the latest issue of The American Scholar, psycholinguistics graduate student Jessica Love explains how she became entranced with a mild-mannered part of speech, the pronoun. "I have fallen for pronouns," Love writes. "It's hard to shut me up about them."  Continue reading...
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Blog Excerpts

A Map of American English, via Twitter

Computational linguist David Bamman has created a fascinating new website called Lexicalist. By analyzing Twitter and other social media, he has mapped the U.S. according to what people are talking about, and how they're saying it. Bamman explains how the project came together in a guest Language Log post here.
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Blog Excerpts

Pronouncing the Volcano

The volcano in Iceland that has disrupted European air travel goes by the impenetrable name Eyjafjallajökull. Don't know how to pronounce it? Neither does anyone else outside of Iceland. Mark Liberman of Language Log presents some outsiders' failed attempts, as well as proper pronunciations from actual Icelanders, here.
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Today is Veterans Day in the United States, and linguist Neal Whitman has been thinking about a question of military usage: if "50,000 troops" refers to 50,000 people, then does "one troop" refer to one person?  Continue reading...
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Blog Excerpts

More on "Text(ed)"

Exploring a topic discussed here back in April, the British linguist John Wells considers how people are forming the past tense of the verb "to text" (often pronounced, like the present tense, as "text"). Read about it on Dr. Wells's phonetics blog here.
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6 7 8 9 10 Displaying 50-56 of 101 Articles