5 6 7 8 9 Displaying 43-49 of 93 Articles

Stan Carey, a professional editor from Ireland, writes entertainingly about the English language on his blog Sentence First. Here Stan warns of the perilous ambiguity that can result from incautious use of the word that.  Continue reading...
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Just in time for Sunday's season premiere of "Mad Men," my latest "On Language" column in The New York Times Magazine considers how authentically the show represents the speech of the 1960s. The creators of the AMC series, led by head honcho Matthew Weiner, are obsessive about getting the details of language right, just like all the other details of the show. But fans can be equally obsessive, on the lookout for the smallest linguistic anachronisms.  Continue reading...
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Blog Excerpts

The Future of Electronic Reading

The Los Angeles Times takes a fascinating look at how electronic reading has the potential to revolutionize the concept of the book. "Books are increasingly able to talk to readers, quiz them on their grasp of the material, play videos to illustrate a point or connect them with a community of fellow readers." Read the article here.
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Blog Excerpts

Oops!

For "Oops," the latest episode of WNYC's Radiolab, Visual Thesaurus editor Ben Zimmer shares examples of unfortunate search-and-replace errors. (Did you know Queen Elizabeth lays 2,000 eggs a day?) Listen here, and check out Language Log for further reading.
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The esteemed British newsweekly The Economist has launched a new blog all about language and its relation to global politics and culture. Though the blog is newly hatched, its name is venerable: Johnson, after the great lexicographer Samuel Johnson.  Continue reading...
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Blog Excerpts

Most Looked-Up Words in the Times, 2010

As it did last year, The New York Times has tabulated the words that readers of the Times website click on the most to look up definitions. This year's leaders include inchoate, profligacy, sui generis, and austerity. Read all about it on the "After Deadline" blog here.
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One of the qualities of New York Times writing is that it not only informs clearly (almost all the time), concisely (almost all the time), and gracefully (almost all the time) — but that it delights. On almost every page, well-turned phrases, alliterations, similes and word play amuse and delight readers. My favorite Times verbal delight, though, is the headline that contains an allusion to a song.  Continue reading...
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5 6 7 8 9 Displaying 43-49 of 93 Articles