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Blog Excerpts

Winning Grammar Haiku

Last week, in honor of National Grammar Day, editor Mark Allen hosted a contest for grammar-related haiku. The winner was submitted by Gord Roberts: "Spell-checkers won't catch / You're mistaken homophones / Scattered hear and their." Read all the submissions on Mark's blog here, here, and here.
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Blog Excerpts

Make a Grammar Haiku!

"Well formed haiku bring / National Grammar Day glory / tweet your best today." In advance of National Grammar Day on March 4th, editor Mark Allen is hosting a haiku-writing contest. Submit your grammar-related haiku by posting it to Twitter with the hashtag #GrammarDay. Deadline is 10 p.m. on March 3rd! Details here.
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Edulinks

Useful sites for educators

Enriching Women's History Month with Vocabulary

If you are looking for some great documents to help your students learn more about Women's History, look no further. The National Archives' Teaching with Documents is a great resource for Women's History Month. Choose a document and have students use VocabGrabber to help them interpret challenging vocabulary. "Failure is Impossible" is a short skit written in honor of the women's suffrage movement and the 19th Amendment; here is a vocabulary list for the skit created with VocabGrabber.

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Blog Excerpts

Wordquake!

Last week, a study was published tracking word frequencies on the blogosphere, and researchers found that certain words can have earthquake-like effects. The researchers, from the Medical University of Vienna, examined 168 political blogs in the United States and monitored spikes in word frequency. They discovered that some events can trigger influential "reverberations."  Continue reading...
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This month in the Lounge, we take a look at the much buzzed-about "culturomics" paper in the journal Science and the related "Ngram viewer" rolled about Google to track the history of language and culture. What does the trendy "culturomic" approach to data-crunching have to offer those harmless drudges, the lexicographers?  Continue reading...
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Last week, an exciting new tool for analyzing the history of language and culture was unveiled by Google. They call it the "Ngram Viewer," and it's an interface to study the enormous corpus of historical texts scanned by Google Books. The Ngram Viewer was rolled out in conjunction with a paper in the journal Science introducing the field of "culturomics." Dennis Baron has weighed in on the significance of this development for researchers. But what about those peculiar words, culturomics and ngram?  Continue reading...
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People judge you by the words you use. This warning, once the slogan of a vocabulary building course, is now the mantra of the new science of culturomics.  Continue reading...
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6 7 8 9 10 Displaying 50-56 of 138 Articles