WORD LISTS

50 Words from Jane Austen's "Pride & Prejudice"

January 28, 2013
Quiz yourself on words that mark Jane Austen's 1813 masterpiece as of its time.
scrupulous
"You are over-scrupulous, surely.
vex
It would vex me, indeed, to see you again the dupe of Miss Bingley's pretended regard."
deign
Mrs. Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters.
venture
Her mother's thoughts she plainly saw were bent the same way, and she determined not to venture near her, lest she might hear too much.
surpass
"Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can be really esteemed accomplished who does not greatly surpass what is usually met with.
rapture
"Now, Kitty, you may cough as much as you choose," said Mr. Bennet; and, as he spoke, he left the room, fatigued with the raptures of his wife.
amends
At that instant, she felt that years of happiness could not make Jane or herself amends for moments of such painful confusion.
ingenious
They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
surmise
They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
elude
They attacked him in various ways--with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all, and they were at last obliged to accept the second-hand intelligence of their neighbour, Lady Lucas.
countenance
Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
unaffected
Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
pronounce
The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compare
figure
The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compare
fastidious
"I would not be so fastidious as you are," cried Mr. Bingley, "for a kingdom!
cordial
Mr. Darcy walked off; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings toward him.
gratify
"I am exceedingly gratified," said Bingley, "by your converting what my friend says into a compliment on the sweetness of my temper.
censure
"I would not wish to be hasty in censuring anyone; but I always speak what I think."
affectation
Affectation of candour is common enough--one meets with it everywhere.
dispose
Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them.
deficient
They were in fact very fine ladies; not deficient in good humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of making themselves agreeable when they chose it, but proud and conceited.
associate
They were rather handsome, had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town, had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds, were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank, and were therefore in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others.
endear
Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he never appeared dissatisfied.
haughty
He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious, and his manners, though well-bred, were not inviting.
reserved
He was at the same time haughty, reserved, and fastidious, and his manners, though well-bred, were not inviting.
commendation
Miss Bennet was therefore established as a sweet girl, and their brother felt authorized by such commendation to think of her as he chose.
render
For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
supercilious
For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him supercilious; on the contrary, he was all attention to everybody.
mortified
"That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine."
impertinent
He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him."
provoke
On his approaching them soon afterwards, though without seeming to have any intention of speaking, Miss Lucas defied her friend to mention such a subject to him; which immediately provoking Elizabeth to do it, she turned to him and said: "Did you not think, Mr. Darcy, that I expressed myself uncommonly well just now, when I was teasing Colonel Forster to give us a ball at Meryton?"
persevere
On Miss Lucas's persevering, however, she added, "Very well, if it must be so, it must."
swell
And gravely glancing at Mr. Darcy, "There is a fine old saying, which everybody here is of course familiar with: 'Keep your breath to cool your porridge'; and I shall keep mine to swell my song."
entreaty
After a song or two, and before she could reply to the entreaties of several that she would sing again, she was eagerly succeeded at the instrument by her sister Mary, who having, in consequence of being the only plain one in the family, worked hard for knowledge and accomplishments, was always impatient for display.
genius
Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
pedantic
Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
engrossed
Mr. Darcy stood near them in silent indignation at such a mode of passing the evening, to the exclusion of all conversation, and was too much engrossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was his neighbour, till Sir William thus began: "What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing after all. I consider it as one of the first refinements of polished society."
vogue
"Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world.
propriety
Mr. Darcy, with grave propriety, requested to be allowed the honour of her hand, but in vain.
reverie
"I can guess the subject of your reverie."
stricture
What would I give to hear your strictures on them!"
meditate
I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow."
indifference
He listened to her with perfect indifference while she chose to entertain herself in this manner; and as his composure convinced her that all was safe, her wit flowed long.
wit
He listened to her with perfect indifference while she chose to entertain herself in this manner; and as his composure convinced her that all was safe, her wit flowed long.
contrived
Elizabeth then contrived to sit by her aunt.
impute
"I find myself very unwell this morning, which, I suppose, is to be imputed to my getting wet through yesterday.
pursuit
"Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness--if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of Mr. Bingley, and under your orders."
trifling
People do not die of little trifling colds.
contempt
That she should have walked three miles so early in the day, in such dirty weather, and by herself, was almost incredible to Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley; and Elizabeth was convinced that they held her in contempt for it.
solicitude
When breakfast was over they were joined by the sisters; and Elizabeth began to like them herself, when she saw how much affection and solicitude they showed for Jane.

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Tuesday January 29th 2013, 11:54 AM
Comment by: Relly Rell
I LOVE LOVE LOVE JANE AUSTEN SHE I THE BEST BEST BEST NOVELIST OF THE 1700'S WILL WE EVER EVER EVER FIND ANYONE LIKE HER SHE IS THE BEST BEST BEST OF HER PEOPLE.
Wednesday January 30th 2013, 12:02 PM
Comment by: Superhands
"Pride", and "Prejudice" should probably be words on this list.

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