WORD LISTS

Poe's Favorite Words, collected by Charles Harrington Elster

July 25, 2013
San Diego's citywide celebration of Poe included this tribute from a local columnist. Drawn from The Gory, Glorious Words of Edgar Allan Poe: Shades of Poe voiceofsandiego.org April 16, 2012
abyss
“The can will never disappear,” it continued, warning that the United States was falling “into an abyss you can never come out of.”
New York Times (Jan 3, 2013)
afflicted
Though these allergies can be quite unpleasant for the afflicted, but are usually not life threatening.
Scientific American (May 30, 2013)
aghast
Aghast economists fear that such exorbitant spending could saddle an already impoverished nation with an insurmountable deficit.
Time (Apr 16, 2013)
agony
People might still suffer annoying bites but they would be spared the painful agony that has earned Dengue the nickname “breakbone fever.”
Scientific American (Jun 11, 2013)
appalling
There is also still appalling behaviour from this dreadful regime using chemical weapons.
BBC (Jul 21, 2013)
apparition
His sleep is troubled; he sees his victims as monstrous apparitions haunting him.
Time (Jul 18, 2013)
crypt
At times he looked little more than those mummified bodies in vestments you see in some crypts in southern Italy.
Newsweek (Feb 15, 2013)
demoniacal
The waves still rolled on; but now he heard what seemed like wild, demoniacal laughter.
Joseph Hocking
desolate
It goes beyond documentary, drawing on a visionary stage vocabulary and creating individual stories that are both desolating and stirring.
The Guardian (Jan 26, 2013)
dirge
But then the quartet stripped down to black shirts, picked up bass tubas and horns and started playing what sounded like a funeral dirge.
The Guardian (Jan 23, 2013)
emaciated
Mr Hankin told jurors that a gastroenterology expert found Daniel was "extremely emaciated" and had a low body mass index.
BBC (Jun 3, 2013)
enshroud
But Pluto could be enshrouded by smaller debris shed by the moons.
New York Times (Jul 12, 2012)
fitful
But they have received only fitful attention from researchers over the decades, thanks to constantly shifting agendas and funding levels.
Nature (Dec 5, 2012)
frenzied
There are enthralling episodes when Ms. Mearns dances with graceful movements tinged with frenzied compulsion.
New York Times (Jun 28, 2013)
ghastly
An entire generation were robbed of their education by Sierra Leone's ghastly, decade-long civil war.
BBC (Apr 22, 2013)
grotesque
Even some of the grotesque murder scenes are imaginatively rendered.
Seattle Times (Jun 13, 2013)
hideous
I bought and wore hideous neon green pants and tank tops.
Forbes (Jun 24, 2013)
immolation
And, if it were for sale, it could not be purchased by an act of immolation in which heaven could find no pleasure at all.
Frank Boreham
intolerable
Tchaikovsky was even worse; when composing a new work, David Brown writes, "he found any company intolerable not only during the morning but all day."
Slate (May 1, 2013)
malady
British drug company is betting that medicine made from cannabis can also treat maladies as diverse as diabetes, colitis, and epilepsy.
BusinessWeek (Jul 19, 2013)
pallid
I could see the muted terror in their eyes when they'd come to visit, appraising my pallid, sweating face and withered body.
New York Times (Jan 18, 2013)
prostrate
Grown men prostrated themselves in front of him and asked for his blessing.
BBC (Sep 27, 2012)
quiver
He jiggled his amputated leg to make it look like it was quivering
Seattle Times (Mar 24, 2013)
sullen
Lester often seemed sullen, showing displeasure with umpires and defeatist body language when things went wrong.
New York Times (Jun 1, 2013)
tremulous
“It’s only me, Philip, lad,” whispered a hoarse, tremulous voice.
E. Phillips Oppenheim, (Edward Phillips)
writhe
For the next excruciating year, my friend went through episodes where he could do nothing but lie writhing in bed in pain.
New York Times (Jul 6, 2013)
wretched
He looked absolutely wretched, like a beaten dog.
The Guardian (Jan 18, 2013)
acrid
Barricades of rubble blocked other streets leading to the square and the acrid smell of tear gas hung in the air.
Reuters (Jun 4, 2013)
endeavor
My endeavor did require a certain amount of intrepid travel, though not the kind that involves eating ants or crossing rivers on makeshift rafts.
New York Times (Jun 21, 2013)
lofty
He was energetic but the game did not meet his lofty expectations.
New York Times (Jun 19, 2013)
impetuous
Both have a headlong exuberance, are filled with caustic satire and ultimately show impetuous romance giving way to hard-headed realism.
The Guardian (Nov 22, 2012)
repugnance
But as Kathmandu developed, a gradual repugnance rose against such intimate handling of human waste, and new flush toilets secured the sensation.
Scientific American (Dec 17, 2012)
veracity
Without some faith in ministers' veracity, public trust in democracy withers still further.
The Guardian (May 31, 2013)
sagacious
Bran listened with sagacious eye and ears erect, and understood Oscar's words quite well.
Unknown
decrepitude
For many fruit trees, 75 years is late middle age; 100 is decrepitude
New York Times (Nov 21, 2012)
prodigious
He’s a prodigious fundraiser, tapping into Texas wealth like no other.
Time (Jul 9, 2013)
elucidation
In all I saw there was a mystery that needed elucidation.
Mayne Reid
sonorous
The actors have crisp timing and effective voices, particularly Mr. Adams’s sonorous bass.
New York Times (Jun 10, 2012)
turgid
Texture Crisp and turgid, reflecting the high water pressure within the cells.
New York Times (Jul 9, 2013)
prolixity
His prolixity was increased by his unwillingness, when writing without prescribed limits, to leave out any detail, however unimportant.
Various
ague
Wyndham, shivering with ague, had sat down and rested his head in his hands, as if he did not know what was going on.
Harold Bindloss
apothegm
"Necessity," says the old apothegm, "is the mother of invention."
Homer B. Sprague (Homer Baxter)
auto-da-fe
He cannot acquire so much as a souphouse ticket in that city not made with hands by dying for the faith in the auto-da-fe.
William Cowper Brann
castellated
There were old castles with broken ruined towers, battlements, and loopholes; castellated fortresses; cathedrals with fantastic Gothic carving, and delicate tracery, and triumphal arches.
Frederick Whymper
eld
She was not always able to ignore the contrast between the spring of youth and this meagre eld.
Alice Brown
moiety
The French exhibits filled one-half the entire space, the remaining moiety being occupied by the other nations of the world.
Various
paean
Nonetheless, it does eventually pay dividends, particularly in Simon Stephens's paean to blue skies and independent coffee shops
The Guardian (Jun 27, 2012)
pertinacity
Only cultivate that dogged pertinacity of Gad, which has no thought of ultimate defeat, but rallies cheerfully and resolutely after every discomfiture.
Marcus Dods
Stygian
In the most Stygian of these, I plumbed abysses that no brother of Jesus should ever have had to endure.
The Guardian (Aug 21, 2010)
supposititious
Argument is at an end when supposititious miracle is introduced.
Hugh Miller

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