WORD LISTS

Frankenburger!

August 8, 2013
The first hamburger grown in a lab was tasted this week. What does this mean for the future of meat? Here are 13 words to help with the science behind the so-called "Frankenburger." Drawn from Bring on the ‘Frankenburger New York Times, August 5, 2013
ethical
It’s been increasingly clear since then that there are both environmental and — obviously — ethical advantages to using technology to sustain omnivory on a crowding planet.
sustain
It’s been increasingly clear since then that there are both environmental and — obviously — ethical advantages to using technology to sustain omnivory on a crowding planet.
presume
This presumes humans will not all soon shift to a purely vegetarian lifestyle, even though there are signs of what you might call “peak meat” (consumption, that is) in prosperous societies (Mark Bittman wrote a nice piece on this).
consumption
This presumes humans will not all soon shift to a purely vegetarian lifestyle, even though there are signs of what you might call “peak meat” (consumption, that is) in prosperous societies (Mark Bittman wrote a nice piece on this).
prosperous
This presumes humans will not all soon shift to a purely vegetarian lifestyle, even though there are signs of what you might call “peak meat” (consumption, that is) in prosperous societies (Mark Bittman wrote a nice piece on this).
in vitro
Now non-farmed meat is back in the headlines, with a patty of in-vitro beef – widely dubbed a “frankenburger” — fried and served in London earlier today.
conventional
One taster, Josh Schonwald, a Chicago-based author of a book on the future of food [link], said “the bite feels like a conventional hamburger” but that the meat tasted “like an animal-protein cake.”
viable
Dr. Post, one of a handful of scientists working in the field, said there was still much research to be done and that it would probably take 10 years or more before cultured meat was commercially viable.
feasible
The enormous potential environmental benefits of shifting meat production, where feasible, from farms to factories were estimated in “Environmental Impacts of Cultured Meat Production,”a 2011 study in Environmental Science and Technology.
cultivation
A 2011 analysis estimating various environmental impacts of meat production found that lab cultivation would beat other sources in almost every category.
emission
(“GHG” is greenhouse gas emissions.)
husbandry
It’d be hard to find any argument that can justify the conditions in which animals are routinely raised for slaughter today in the concentrated, industrial-style form of husbandry that is required to provide cheap meat to growing and increasingly prosperous populations.
refine
But it’s great to see researchers like Mark Post, and entrepreneurs like Sergey Brin, pushing hard to refine basic processes for meat cultivation.

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