WORD LISTS

Celebrating the 19th Amendment with "Failure is Impossible"

February 24, 2011
This vocabulary list was created with VocabGrabber from "Failure is Impossible" ( http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/woman-suffrage/script.html), a short play written to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the passing of the 19th amendment.
Nineteenth Amendment
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
suffragist
When the Civil War began in 1861, suffragists deferred their campaign for the vote to give full attention to the national crisis.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Elizabeth Cady Stanton said later:

Reader #1 (Elizabeth Cady Stanton): We felt as helpless and hopeless as if we had suddenly been asked to construct a steam engine.
narrator
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
Sojourner Truth
Narrator: Sojourner Truth, whose speech "Ain't I a Woman?" had so moved the Equal Rights Convention in 1851, spoke again in 1867 for women's right to vote.
Stanton
Elizabeth Cady Stanton said later:

Reader #1 (Elizabeth Cady Stanton): We felt as helpless and hopeless as if we had suddenly been asked to construct a steam engine.
Lucy Stone
Narrator: In the 1850s, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone led a group of courageous women who plunged headlong into the fight for abolition and universal suffrage.
suffrage
Narrator: In the 1850s, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone led a group of courageous women who plunged headlong into the fight for abolition and universal suffrage.
exploitive
Narrator: By 1900, over three million women worked for wages outside the home, often in hazardous and exploitive conditions, often with their children beside them at the machinery.
right to vote
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
Louisa May Alcott
Louisa May Alcott and thousands of other women served as nurses.
cracker-barrel
This is how it worked:

Reader #3 ("Feeler Feelix," Cracker-Barrel Philosopher): Women's petitions are generally referred to a fool committee of fools, . . . carefully laid on the floor of the committee room to be a target at which to shoot tobacco juice.
reader
In 1776, when John Adams sat with a committee of men in Philadelphia, writing the Declaration of Independence, he got a letter from his wife, Abigail:

Reader #1 (Abigail Adams): John, in the new code of laws . . . remember the ladies.
dead duck
Elizabeth Cady Stanton said of President Rutherford Hayes:

Reader #1 (Stanton): In President Hayes's last message, he reviews the interests of the Republic, from the army [and] the navy to . . . the crowded condition of the mummies, dead ducks and fishes in the Smithsonian Institution.
founding father
The problem began with the words of the Founding Fathers.
Frederick Douglass
At the convention, abolitionist Frederick Douglass spoke in favor of women voting.
First World War
Finally, in 1917, at the height of the First World War, President Wilson spoke to urge the Congress to act on suffrage:

Reader # 3 (Woodrow Wilson): This is a people's war.
immortalize
Narrator: Twenty-four hours before she died, in 1902, Stanton dictated this plea to Theodore Roosevelt:

Reader #1 (Stanton): Mr. President, Abraham Lincoln immortalized himself by the emancipation of four million slaves.
1840s
In the 1840s respectable women did not even speak in public, let alone call meetings.
Susan B. Anthony
Narrator: In the 1850s, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone led a group of courageous women who plunged headlong into the fight for abolition and universal suffrage.
woman
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
1850s
Narrator: In the 1850s, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone led a group of courageous women who plunged headlong into the fight for abolition and universal suffrage.
enfranchise
Elizabeth Cady Stanton's daughter reminded them:

Reader #1 (Harriot Stanton Blatch): The suffragists of Civil War days gave up their campaign to work for their country, expecting to be enfranchised in return for all their good services.
sojourner
Narrator: Sojourner Truth, whose speech "Ain't I a Woman?" had so moved the Equal Rights Convention in 1851, spoke again in 1867 for women's right to vote.
unsex
The senator from Tennessee called it "a reform against nature" and predicted it would " unsex and degrade the women of America."
disfranchise
We ask that you extend the right of suffrage to women—the only remaining class of disfranchised citizens—and thus fulfill your constitutional obligation.
vote
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
President Hayes
Elizabeth Cady Stanton said of President Rutherford Hayes:

Reader #1 (Stanton): In President Hayes's last message, he reviews the interests of the Republic, from the army [and] the navy to . . . the crowded condition of the mummies, dead ducks and fishes in the Smithsonian Institution.
petition
In 1865, when the war was over, and Congress debated an amendment to give freed slaves the right to vote, the suffragists petitioned Congress to include women, too.
shirtwaist
In the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, 146 workers were killed trying to escape an unsafe building into which they had been locked to keep them at work.
referendum
Reader #1: In 1912 the suffrage referendum was passed in Arizona, Kansas, and Oregon.
eyewitness
Reader #3 ( eyewitness article): In New York, 1,030,000 women signed a petition asking for the right to vote.
founding
The problem began with the words of the Founding Fathers.
disfranchised
We ask that you extend the right of suffrage to women—the only remaining class of disfranchised citizens—and thus fulfill your constitutional obligation.
Woodrow Wilson
Narrator: In 1913, five thousand women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue on the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration, asking for the vote.
voting
Do I hear you say, wait a minute, the country is two hundred and nineteen years old, and women have only been voting for seventy-five years?
Declaration of Independence
In 1776, when John Adams sat with a committee of men in Philadelphia, writing the Declaration of Independence, he got a letter from his wife, Abigail:

Reader #1 (Abigail Adams): John, in the new code of laws . . . remember the ladies.
amendment
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.
enfranchised
Elizabeth Cady Stanton's daughter reminded them:

Reader #1 (Harriot Stanton Blatch): The suffragists of Civil War days gave up their campaign to work for their country, expecting to be enfranchised in return for all their good services.
Alcott
Louisa May Alcott and thousands of other women served as nurses.
Seneca
Narrator: In 1848 a group of women organized the first Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York.
universal suffrage
Narrator: In the 1850s, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone led a group of courageous women who plunged headlong into the fight for abolition and universal suffrage.
emancipate
You are now amending the Constitution, and . . . placing new safeguards around the individual rights of four million emancipated slaves.
pulpit
Nearly sixty years later, when Sarah and Angelina Grimke spoke to state legislatures about the evils of slavery, their actions were denounced from the pulpit as contrary to God's law and the natural order.
framer
If the Framers of the Constitution meant they should not, why did they not distinctly say so?
Constitution
Narrator: But when the Founding Fathers sat down to write the Declaration and the Constitution, they left out one critical word: "Women."
convention
Narrator: In 1848 a group of women organized the first Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York.
ballot
I ask the ballot for myself and my sex.
ungracious
Reader #3 (Mr. Reagan, of Texas): I hope sir, that it will not be considered ungracious in me that I oppose the will of any lady.
right
Narrator: Today is the seventy-fifth anniversary of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote.

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