1 2 3 4 5 Displaying 8-14 of 33 Articles

International bestselling author M. J. Rose's The Hypnotist is an adventure, a love story, a clash of cultures, and a spiritual quest. Above all, it is a thrilling capstone to her Reincarnation novels, The Reincarnationist and The Memoirist. Here M.J. shares the inspiration behind her latest novel.  Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Backstory.

Blog Excerpts

Parliamentary Language

Contentini, a UK-based content strategy firm, has analyzed 75 years of British parliamentary debates to determine trends in the political use of language. Key words like stakeholder and innovation have risen in usage, while others like industry and men have fallen. Read about it here.
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.

Dr. Heidi Hayes Jacobs is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of literacy, curriculum and instruction, and educational reform. In the first part of our interview, Heidi exposes the pitfalls of American literacy instruction and explains what we can do to improve it.  Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Teachers at Work.

Blog Excerpts

A Map of American English, via Twitter

Computational linguist David Bamman has created a fascinating new website called Lexicalist. By analyzing Twitter and other social media, he has mapped the U.S. according to what people are talking about, and how they're saying it. Bamman explains how the project came together in a guest Language Log post here.
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.

On the website Technologizer, Harry McCracken has provided a lovingly detailed history of the term fanboy, as it traveled from the world of underground comics to become "the tech world's favorite put-down." It got me thinking about the development of the mnemonic aid FANBOYS, which every English composition teacher knows is an acronym for the coordinating conjunctions for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.  Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Word Routes.

Blog Excerpts

Next!

Thanks to Chatroulette, the ridiculously popular website that pairs random strangers around the world for webcam conversations, we have a new verb in English: to next. Two language-related blogs explain what it means.  Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Blog Excerpts.

Stan Carey, a professional editor from Ireland, writes entertainingly about the English language on his blog Sentence First. Here a children's book about weather leads Stan to ponder which English words best describe what happens to air when it is heated by lightning.  Continue reading...
Click here to read more articles from Word Count.

1 2 3 4 5 Displaying 8-14 of 33 Articles