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A penny saved is a penny earned, or so says Ben Franklin. As part of our classroom study on aphorisms and early American literature, we take a bit of a side trip into learning about almanacs. For most high schoolers, the mention of an almanac brings about a blank expression. Yet the 200+ year old Farmer's Almanac is still alive and kicking, although the hole (for hanging on the outhouse door) has disappeared.  Continue reading...
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In honor of Valentine's Day, let's revisit one of the most famous couples in the love-story canon: Romeo and Juliet. Remember how the prologue to Shakespeare's play introduces them? "From forth the fatal loins of these two foes / A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life."

Star-cross'd! Isn't it romantic?  Continue reading...
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If you see a word that ends in the suffix -ism, you can be sure it's a noun. But if you are thinking of a noun as a "person, place or thing" and you consider "a thing" as a tangible object, then think again. A word ending in -ism usually represents something more abstract -- like an idea, theory, or doctrine. Use this week's worksheet to introduce students to some words ending in -ism that represent political beliefs.  Continue reading...
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There's a funny ad on TV right now about a guy named Dave. A red-headed man with a beard, he wanders into his office and greets a large number of other bearded red-headed guys also named Dave. Someone named Dave is fixing the photocopier while a mail delivery person, also named Dave, arrives with a package for, you guessed it, Dave.  Continue reading...
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Are you hooked on "Downton Abbey"? The second season of the British period drama has been airing in the U.S. on PBS, and it's been an addictive treat for Anglophiles. But just how accurate is the language used on the show? Though it mostly remains true to its post-Edwardian setting, at times the talk is a bit anachronistic.  Continue reading...
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We'd like to welcome Merrill Perlman, who writes the "Language Corner" column for Columbia Journalism Review, as our newest regular contributor! In this column, she's grabbing at "straws": straw polls, straw men, and straw bashers.  Continue reading...
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Edulinks

Useful sites for educators

Black History Month

 Check out the following sites to find top-notch materials for teaching and learning about African American history:

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1 2 3 4 5 Displaying 15-21 of 29 Articles