WORD LISTS

"Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, Act III

October 18, 2012
Here are links to our lists for the play: Act I, Act II, Act III, Act IV, Act V

Here are links to other plays by William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, Hamlet, King Lear, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Othello, A Midsummer Night's Dream
apt
An I were so apt to quarrel as thou art, any man
should buy the fee-simple of my life for an hour and a quarter.
consort
Mercutio, thou consort'st with Romeo.
villain
Romeo, the hate I bear thee can afford
No better term than this,--thou art a villain
excuse
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting
vile
Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee
Doth much excuse the appertaining rage
To such a greeting
haste
Will you pluck your sword out of his pitcher
by the ears? make haste, lest mine be about your
ears ere it be out.
plague
A plague o' both your houses!
scratch
Note Mercutio is playing with words here -- it's more than just a scratch!
Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch; marry, 'tis enough.
scorn
That gallant spirit hath aspired the clouds,
Which too untimely here did scorn the earth.
fatal
O noble prince, I can discover all
The unlucky manage of this fatal brawl
stout
...Underneath whose arm
An envious thrust from Tybalt hit the life
Of stout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled
exile
And for that offence
Immediately we do exile him hence,
garish
All the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.
wound
I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes,--
God save the mark!--here on his manly breast.
banish
Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished.
fiend
Note the wordplay here -- calling someone both a "fiend" and "angelical" is an oxymoron
Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical!
Dove-feather'd raven! wolvish-ravening lamb!
grief
If sour woe delights in fellowship
And needly will be rank'd with other griefs,
Why follow'd not, when she said 'Tybalt's dead,'
Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
Which modern lamentations might have moved?
comfort
And Tybalt's dead, that would have slain my husband:
All this is comfort; wherefore weep I then?
fellowship
If sour woe delights in fellowship
And needly will be rank'd with other griefs,
Why follow'd not, when she said 'Tybalt's dead,'
Thy father, or thy mother, nay, or both,
Which modern lamentations might have moved?
torture
Not it's not physical torture here, but emotional
There is no world without Verona walls,
But purgatory, torture, hell itself
murder
Calling death banishment,
Thou cutt'st my head off with a golden axe,
And smilest upon the stroke that murders me.
mercy
This is dear mercy, and thou seest it not.
carrion
More validity,
More honourable state, more courtship lives
In carrion-flies than Romeo.
dote
Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,
An hour but married, Tybalt murdered,
Doting like me and like me banished,
Then mightst thou speak, then mightst thou tear thy hair,
And fall upon the ground, as I do now,
Taking the measure of an unmade grave.
shape
Fie, fie, thou shamest thy shape, thy love, thy wit;
wit
Fie, fie, thou shamest thy shape, thy love, thy wit
dismember
Thy wit... Is set afire by thine own ignorance,
And thou dismember'd with thine own defence
lamentation
Beg pardon of the prince, and call thee back
With twenty hundred thousand times more joy
Than thou went'st forth in lamentation.
woo
These times of woe afford no time to woo.
fickle
O fortune, fortune! all men call thee fickle.
beseech
Good father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.

Create a new Word List