WORD LISTS

"Hatchet" by Gary Paulsen, Chapters 1–4

February 22, 2013
The sole survivor of a plane crash in the Canadian wilderness, thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson will need resourcefulness, courage, and strength in order to stay alive.

Here are links to our lists for the novel: Chapters 1–4, Chapters 5–8, Chapters 9–12, Chapters 13–16, Chapters 17–Epilogue

Here is a link to our lists for The Voyage of the Frog by Gary Paulsen.
consuming
It was a small plane, a Cessna 406—a bushplane—and the engine was so loud, so roaring and consuming and loud, that it ruined any chance for conversation.
initial
There had been the initial excitement, of course.
altitude
He had never flown in a single-engine plane before and to be sitting in the copilot’s seat with all the controls right there in front of him, all the instruments in his face as the plane clawed for altitude, jerking and sliding on the wind currents as the pilot took off, had been interesting and exciting.
current
He had never flown in a single engine plane before and to be sitting in the copilot’s seat with all the controls right there in front of him, all the instruments in his face as the plane clawed for altitude, jerking and sliding on the wind currents as the pilot took off, had been interesting and exciting.
drone
But in five minutes they had leveled off at six thousand feet and headed northwest and from then on the pilot had been silent, staring out the front, and the drone of the engine had been all that was left.
seep
Instead his eyes burned and tears came, the seeping tears that burned, but he didn’t cry.
indicate
On the dashboard in front of him Brian saw the dials, switches, meters, knobs, levers, cranks, lights, handles that were wiggling and flickering, all indicating nothing that he understood and the pilot seemed the same way.
overcome
He leaned over and lifted the headset off his right ear and put it on his temple, yelling to overcome the sound of the engine.
slew
The plane slewed suddenly to the right.
gratitude
But the pilot had put his headset back on and the gratitude was lost in the engine noise and things went back to Brian looking out the window at the ocean of trees and lakes.
lurch
Now the plane lurched slightly to the right and Brian looked at the pilot.
tundra
He was working in the oil fields of Canada, up on the tree line where the tundra started and the forests ended.
constant
Now there was a constant odor, and Brian took another look at the pilot, found him rubbing the shoulder and down the arm now, the left arm, letting go more gas and wincing.
wince
Now there was a constant odor, and Brian took another look at the pilot, found him rubbing the shoulder and down the arm now, the left arm, letting go more gas and wincing.
hatchet
Inside there was a hatchet, the kind with a steel handle and a rubber handgrip.
stout
The head was in a stout leather case that had a brass-riveted belt loop.
hokey
And he would normally have said no, would normally have said no that it looked too hokey to have a hatchet on your belt.
grimace
Brian turned again to glance at the pilot who had both hands on his stomach and was grimacing in pain, reaching for the left shoulder again as Brian watched.
audible
The pilot’s words were a hiss, barely audible.
spasm
He stopped as a fresh spasm of pain hit him.
jolt
And now a jolt took him like a hammerblow, so forcefully that he seemed to crush back into the seat, and Brian reached for him, could not understand at first what it was, could not know.
rigid
The pilot’s mouth went rigid, he swore and jerked a short series of slams into the seat, holding his shoulder now.
altimeter
Down beneath that were dials with lines that seemed to indicate what the winds were doing, tipping or moving, and one dial with a needle pointing to the number 70, which he thought—only thought—might be the altimeter. The device that told him his height above the ground. Or above sea level.
depress
He had seen the pilot use it, had seen him depress the switch at his belt, so Brian pushed the switch in and blew into the mike.
hurtle
He felt like a prisoner, kept in a small cell that was hurtling through the sky at what he thought to be 160 miles an hour, headed—he didn’t know where—just headed somewhere until...
throttle
Or he could pull the throttle out and make it go down now. He had seen the pilot push the throttle in to increase speed. If he pulled the throttle back out, the engine would slow down and the plane would go down.
vague
He had a vague feeling that he was wrong to keep heading as the plane was heading, a feeling that he might be going off in the wrong direction, but he could not bring himself to stop the engine and fall.
coarse
Pulling until his hands caught at weeds and muck, pulling and screaming until his hands caught at last in grass and brush and he felt his chest on land, felt his face in the coarse blades of grass and he stopped, everything stopped.
abate
When he opened them again it was evening and some of the sharp pain had abated—there were many dull aches—and the crash came back to him fully.
hoarse
He mumbled it, almost in a hoarse whisper.
graze
His forehead felt massively swollen to the touch, almost like a mound out over his eyes, and it was so tender that when his fingers grazed it he nearly cried.
remnant
He pulled the torn remnants of his windbreaker, pieces really, around his shoulders and tried to hold what heat his body could find.
horde
With it came some warmth, small bits of it at first, and with the heat came clouds of insects—thick, swarming hordes of mosquitos that flocked to his body, made a living coat on his exposed skin, clogged his nostrils when he inhaled, poured into his mouth when he opened it to take a breath.
agony
In the end he sat with the windbreaker pulled up, brushed with his hands and took it, almost crying in frustration and agony.
daze
Brian watched them for a time, still in the half- daze, still not thinking well.

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Thursday December 12th 2013, 9:16 PM
Comment by: Catz (NJ)
THE EXAMPLES ARE CONFUSING
Monday January 18th 2016, 11:28 AM
Comment by: Tegan L. (Canada)
HELLO TRACE
Wednesday January 20th 2016, 4:30 PM
Comment by: Muffin (GA)
This is very helpful
Wednesday February 17th 2016, 1:47 PM
Comment by: DeVonte D. (GA)
yes! we can meet together
I hope to see you some
day
Trace S.(canada)
Thursday February 18th 2016, 12:23 PM
Comment by: DeVonte D. (GA)
yes! this website is very
helper when it comes to
reading
Muffin (GA)
Thursday February 25th 2016, 1:47 PM
Comment by: Enrique C. (CA)
Trace you live in canada?

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