WORD LISTS

"The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark" by William Shakespeare, Act 5

April 13, 2013
Shakespeare's famous tragedy tells the story of a Danish prince who must decide whether or not to avenge his father's death. Read the full text here.

Here are links to our lists for the play: Act 1, Act 2, Act 3, Act 4, Act 5
heathen
What, art a heathen? How dost thou understand the Scripture?
gallows
I like thy wit well, in good faith. The gallows does well. But how does it well? It does well to those that do ill. Now, thou dost ill to say the gallows is built stronger than the church. Argal, the gallows may do well to thee.
courtier
Or of a courtier, which could say “Good morrow, sweet lord! How dost thou, sweet lord?”
quiddity
Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddities now, his quillities, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks?
recognizance
Hum, this fellow might be in ’s time a great buyer of land, with his statutes, his recognizances, his fines, his double vouchers, his recoveries.
indenture
Will his vouchers vouch him no more of his purchases, and double ones too, than the length and breadth of a pair of indentures?
equivocation
How absolute the knave is! We must speak by the card, or equivocation will undo us.
flagon
He poured a flagon of Rhenish on my head once.
abhor
He hath bore me on his back a thousand times, and now how abhorred in my imagination it is!
gibe
Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar?
loam
Alexander died, Alexander was buried, Alexander returneth to dust; the dust is earth; of earth we make loam; and why of that loam whereto he was converted might they not stop a beer barrel?
betoken
Who is this they follow?
And with such maimèd rites? This doth betoken
The corse they follow did with desp’rate hand
Fordo its own life.
requiem
We should profane the service of the dead
To sing a requiem and such rest to her
As to peace-parted souls.
churlish
I tell thee, churlish priest,
A minist'ring angel shall my sister be,
When thou liest howling.
asunder
Pluck them asunder.
tributary
An earnest conjuration from the king,
As England was his faithful tributary,
As love between them like the palm might flourish,
As peace should still her wheaten garland wear
And stand a comma 'tween their amities
amity
An earnest conjuration from the king,
As England was his faithful tributary,
As love between them like the palm might flourish,
As peace should still her wheaten garland wear
And stand a comma 'tween their amities
insinuation
Their defeat
Does by their own insinuation grow.
sultry
But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion.
verity
But, in the verity of extolment, I take him to be a soul of great article...
extol
But, in the verity of extolment, I take him to be a soul of great article...
infallible
Your lordship speaks most infallibly of him.
meed
I mean, sir, for his weapon. But in the imputation laid on him by them, in his meed he's unfellowed.
poniard
The King, sir, hath wagered with him six Barbary horses, against the which he has impawned, as I take it, six French rapiers and poniards, with their assigns, as girdle, hangers, and so.
edify
I knew you must be edified by the margent ere you had done.
germane
The phrase would be more germane to the matter, if we could carry cannon by our sides.
dote
Thus has he (and many more of the same breed that I know the drossy age dotes on) only got the tune of the time, and, out of an habit of encounter, a kind of yeasty collection, which carries them through and through the most fanned and winnowed opinions; and do but blow them to their trial, the bubbles are out.
winnow
Thus has he (and many more of the same breed that I know the drossy age dotes on) only got the tune of the time, and, out of an habit of encounter, a kind of yeasty collection, which carries them through and through the most fanned and winnowed opinions; and do but blow them to their trial, the bubbles are out.
augury
Not a whit. We defy augury. There is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ’tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come.
palpable
A hit, a very palpable hit.
carouse
The queen carouses to thy fortune, Hamlet.
felicity
If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,
Absent thee from felicity awhile
And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain
To tell my story.
havoc
This quarry cries on havoc. O proud Death,
What feast is toward in thine eternal cell
That thou so many princes at a shot
So bloodily hast struck?
carnal
So shall you hear
Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
Of deaths put on by cunning and forced cause,
And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
Fall’n on th’ inventors’ heads.
upshot
So shall you hear
Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
Of deaths put on by cunning and forced cause,
And, in this upshot, purposes mistook
Fall’n on th’ inventors’ heads.

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