WORD LISTS

"Sonnet 116"

December 14, 2014
Who can define Love? William Shakespeare tries to describe what it is and is not in his sonnet.

Here are all the word lists to support the reading of Grade 8 Unit 1's texts from SpringBoard's Common Core ELA series: A Wrinkle in Time, The Drummer Boy of Shiloh, The Odyssey, A Man, Soldier home, Sonnet 116, Where I Find My Heroes, White House Funeral Sermon, O Captain! My Captain!, Frederick Douglass, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, A Definition of a Gentleman
impediment
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
admit impediments.
alter
Love is not love
which alters when it alteration finds
remove
or bends with the remover to remove
fixed
O no! It is an ever- fixed mark
tempest
that looks on tempests and is never shaken
wander
it is the star to every wandering bark
worth
whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken
fool
Love's not time's fool
compass
though rosy lips and cheeks
within his bending sickle's compass come
brief
love alters not with his brief hours and weeks
doom
but bears it out even to the edge of doom
error
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

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Sunday May 15th 2016, 10:31 PM
Comment by: Patrick O. (CA)
Actually, the "definition" or description of true, principled love that will never fail or end is given in the Bible at 1 Corinthians 13:1-8a from which Shakespeare must have got some of his ideas for Sonnet 116.

This love is divine, godly love that is more than romantic or family love. This Love will never fail when it has Jehovah, God, as its Source since He is Eternal, Almighty and because His main cardinal attribute, is Love (1 John 4:8).

Sonnet 116 is very good indeed, for its sentiments are very much in harmony with God's Word - but not commensurate with His Word of course.

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