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I began writing Jump at the Sun in early spring 2001. Or wait -- maybe it was late spring 2001. Or maybe it was the fall. The truth is, I don't remember. I don't remember much about that time. The whole thing, frankly, is a hazy blur.

It's a blur because my daughter was two years old and my son was six months and we had just moved from New York to Boston so my husband could take a new job. I was alone in a new city (actually worse, a new suburb) with small children and no friends and no job and no family and I was starting, seriously, to question the whole thing. Boston. (Still questioning that one). Wifedom. Motherhood.

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Blog Du Jour

Bud's Blogs

Bud Hunt, the teacher we interviewed about student blogging, suggests these links for educators interested in working with Internet technology in the classroom:

"Check out my bloglines account, the contents of which are my regular reads. Another place that folks should look for resources and conversation is EdTechTalk.com. I also recommend Educationbridges, a community of teachers experimenting with social networking and other Web 2.0 tools."

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Bud Hunt writes the respected blog Bud the Teacher, a website for "inquiry and reflection for better teaching." He puts his ideas for innovative education to work as an English teacher at Olde Columbine High School, an alternative public school in Longmont, Colorado. To Bud, inspiring teaching means bringing Internet technology into the classroom. Bud explains:  Continue reading...
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Dog Eared

Books we love

Bud's Book Pick

Teacher Bud Hunt , the innovative educator who introduced blogs into his classroom says, "I strongly recommend reading Will Richardson's Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms."
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For a long time the idea was only a doodle in my notebook. "Happy families," wrote Tolstoy, "are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." Why, I wondered, do so many intelligent people cite that line... without ever seeming to question whether it's true? Do we honestly agree with Tolstoy that only tragedy is interesting... that happiness is boring, cliché? And if so, what does this say about our own expectations and dreams? Is our choice really between being interestingly tragic, or else being automatons of contentment? Or can happiness be quirky, hilarious, deeply challenging?

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Blog Excerpts

OEDILF

Huh? Why, it's Omnificent English Dictionary in Limerick Form. But, of course. This dictionary is more than just a 30,000-plus compilation of limericks by writers from over a dozen countries. It's also a fun way to grow your vocabulary while exploring a treasure of lighthearted verse!
Fun
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I don't know about you, but when I was in school I remember being urged to "improve" my writing by adding more adjectives. As a strategy, I feel this is just wrong, wrong, wrong.

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