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This article briefly describes all the steps necessary to place a shortcut icon on your desktop that will open the Visual Thesaurus Online Edition.  Continue reading...
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This article describes a number of possible solutions to a common problem with the launching the Online Edition.  Continue reading...
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Oration. Recitation. Rhetoric. At one time these were the foundations of a classical literary education, an education that not only prepared you to write and communicate -- but taught you how to think. This style of learning, however, has largely gone the way of the top hat. But is it time for rhetoric to make a reprise? We had a fascinating and wide-ranging conversation with Harvard Professor James Engell, author of The Committed Word: Literature and Public Values, who revived the study of rhetoric at his university after a 60 year hiatus -- and who argues that a classical literary education is critical for today's communicators.  Continue reading...
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Dog Eared

Books we love

Rhetoric and Oration

Professor James Engell, who we interview in this week's "Word Count" feature, recommends these books on rhetoric and oration:

The Art of Public Speaking By Stephen Lucas

Classical Rhetoric for the Modern Student by Edward P. J. Corbett

Analyzing Prose by Richard A. Lanham

Lincoln, Douglas, and Slavery: In the Crucible of Public Debate by David Zarefsky

Norms of Rhetorical Culture by Thomas B. Farrell ("Not for the absolute beginner but tremendously rewarding.")

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Linguist Michael Erard, the author of Um. .. Slips, Stumbles, and Verbal Blunders, and What They Mean who we recently interviewed, graciously sent us this article, which he first wrote and published in the magazine Lingua Franca:

Despite the intent stare and accusatory index finger, when Uncle Sam glowers down from recruitment posters and announces "I Want You for the U.S. Army," it is not absolutely clear what he means. Does he mean you in particular? Or you in general, as in "all of you eligible citizens"? Uncle Sam's ambiguity is not unique.  Continue reading...

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