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Do you remember the anti-red pen mania of a few years ago? If you worked in education, you probably do. This movement, arising from who knows where (I suspect the Chair of a Department of Education at a major university), stipulated that teachers should abandon the dreaded red pen for correcting students’ work. Too much red pen was debilitating, apparently, leaving students far too despondent to even consider making the suggested corrections. As I recall, we were encouraged, instead, to use green or purple pen, which carried less stigma.  Continue reading...
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What better way to toast the 107th birthday of Dr. Seuss than to play with rhyming couplets — his favorite form of writing? In this week's worksheet, students use a famous excerpt from Horton Hears a Who! to learn some vocabulary and to complete the rhyming couplets in the text.  Continue reading...
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Edulinks

Useful sites for educators

Enriching Women's History Month with Vocabulary

If you are looking for some great documents to help your students learn more about Women's History, look no further. The National Archives' Teaching with Documents is a great resource for Women's History Month. Choose a document and have students use VocabGrabber to help them interpret challenging vocabulary. "Failure is Impossible" is a short skit written in honor of the women's suffrage movement and the 19th Amendment; here is a vocabulary list for the skit created with VocabGrabber.

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Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month. Enrich your students' understanding of women's history with the sites suggested in the latest Edulinks.  Continue reading...

For the February VT crossword, we've got a new challenge in store for you. Answer the word-related question posed by the puzzle and you could win a Visual Thesaurus T-shirt!  Continue reading...
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The following is the second part of Erin Brenner's response to the recent piece by Simon Glickman and Julia Rubiner, "'Whose' an Animate Object?" In the first part, Erin considered the use of that to refer to people, and here she examines whether whose should be used for inanimate objects.  Continue reading...
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In a recent article on the Visual Thesaurus, Simon Glickman and Julia Rubiner state that when referring to a person, the writer should always use who and never that. Often I agree with what Glickman and Rubiner say, but not this time.  Continue reading...

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