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One of the qualities of New York Times writing is that it not only informs clearly (almost all the time), concisely (almost all the time), and gracefully (almost all the time) — but that it delights. On almost every page, well-turned phrases, alliterations, similes and word play amuse and delight readers. My favorite Times verbal delight, though, is the headline that contains an allusion to a song.  Continue reading...
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We're revving up for the Indianapolis 500 with a racing-themed crossword puzzle. Solve it and you could win a Visual Thesaurus T-shirt!  Continue reading...
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It's hard to imagine the English language without the word cool as a colloquial description of someone or something first-rate. Over the past half-century of usage, the word has become so omnipresent that it has lost much of its slangy patina. Slang-watcher Connie Eble noted here that when she asks her students at the University of North Carolina to list items of slang, they don't even think of cool, since "it's just ordinary vocabulary for them." How did cool first break through to the mainstream?  Continue reading...
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Traditional vocabulary instruction holds that students learn new words best when they learn them in context. Our "Teachers at Work" contributor Shannon Reed made the startling classroom discovery that context isn't always key.  Continue reading...
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In the latest issue of The American Scholar, psycholinguistics graduate student Jessica Love explains how she became entranced with a mild-mannered part of speech, the pronoun. "I have fallen for pronouns," Love writes. "It's hard to shut me up about them."  Continue reading...
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Last week, in part one of our interview with education expert Heidi Hayes Jacobs we heard about how American educators can revise their literacy instruction to become more active, engaging, and ultimately effective. In part two, Heidi reveals how educational technology, including the Visual Thesaurus, can help keep pace with 21st-century students.  Continue reading...
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1 2 3 4 5 Displaying 1-7 of 33 Articles